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Hispanic Subgroups, Acculturation, and Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes.

Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment 2015;59:74-82. [doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2015.07.008]

Karen G. Chartier, PhD, MSW (Virginia Commonwealth University, MA Node), Thomas Carmody, PhD (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, TX Node), Maleeha Akhtar, MPH (University of Texas Medical School, TX Node), Mary B. Stebbins, MSW (Virginia Commonwealth University, MA Node), Scott T. Walters, PhD (University of North Texas Health Science Center, TX Node), Diane Warden, PhD, MBA (University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, TX Node).

This ancillary investigation of data from NIDA Clinical Trials Network protocol CTN-0021 explored Hispanic subgroup differences in substance use treatment outcomes, and the relationship of acculturation characteristics to these outcomes. Data were from a multisite randomized clinical trial of motivational enhancement therapy versus treatment as usual in a sample of Spanish-speaking substance abusers. Participants were Cuban American (n=34), Mexican American (n=209), Puerto Rican (n=78), and other Hispanic American (n=54). Results suggested that Cuban Americans and individuals with more connection to Hispanic culture had lower treatment retention. Hispanics born in the U.S. and those who spoke English at home had a lower percentage of days abstinent during weeks 5-16, although Puerto Ricans born in the U.S. and Cuban Americans living more years in the U.S. had a higher percentage of days abstinent in weeks 1-4 and 5-16, respectively.

Conclusions: This study's analysis of treatment outcomes and acculturation disaggregated by Hispanic subgroup begins to fill an important and large gap in the substance abuse treatment research literature. Results found that Cuban Americans and individuals with more connection to the Hispanic culture had lower treatment retention, and that acculturation measures such as U.S. birthplace and years living in the U.S. were associated with reduced abstinence in some but not other Hispanic subgroups. These findings provide evidence that the relationships between acculturation and abstinence outcomes are likely complicated and varied across Hispanic groups. Results may inform future hypothesis-driven studies in larger Hispanic treatment seeking samples of the relationship between acculturation and treatment outcome. (Article (Peer-Reviewed), PDF, English, 2015)

Keywords: CTN platform/ancillary study | Hispanics and Latinos | Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET) | Minority groups | Retention - Treatment | Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment (journal)

Document No: 1177, PMID: 26362001, PMCID: PMC4661119.

Submitted by CTN Dissemination Librarians, 11/5/2015.

 

AUTHORS SEARCH LINK
Akhtar, Maleeha mail
Carmody, Thomas mail
Chartier, Karen G. mail
Stebbins, Mary B. mail
Walters, Scott T. mail
Stebbins, Mary B. mail
PROTOCOLS
NIDA-CTN-0021 www

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Supported by a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute.
The materials on this site have neither been created nor reviewed by NIDA.
Updated 12/2016 -- http://ctndisseminationlibrary.org/display/1177.htm
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