PROTOCOL NIDA-CTN-0030-A-2


Effects of Chronic Opioids on the Brain

Roger Weiss, M.D.
David Borsook, M.D., Ph.D.
Lead Investigators

Harvard Medical School, McLean Hospital
rweiss@mclean.harvard.edu
dborsook@mclean.harvard.edu

This ancillary study is related to CTN-0030, "Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS)."

The aims of this proposed data collection supplement (which will be done in collaboration with and support from NIDA Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research) are: (1) to collect and validate facility data necessary to conduct economic analyses associated with comparisons of Bup/Nx treatment with SMM and EMM; and (2) to collect additional patient level data necessary to conduct economic analyses associated with comparisons of Bup/Nx treatment with SMM and EMM. 

PRIMARY FINDINGS

Prescription opioid-dependent subjects had significantly decreased anisotropy in axonal pathways specific to amygdala as well as the internal and external capsules.  Also, significant decreases in functional connectivity were found for seed regions that included the anterior insula, nucleus accumbens, and amygdale subdivisions.  The longer duration of prescription opioid exposure was associated with greater changes in functional connectivity.  Changes in amygdala functional connectivity were dependent on amygdala volume and white matter anisotropy of efferent and afferent pathways of the amygdala.  These findings suggest that prescription opioid dependence may cause multiple anatomical-functional changes in brain.

Results Article: Upadhyay J, et al. Alterations in brain structure and functional connectivity in prescription opioid-dependent patients. Brain 2010;133(7):2098-2114. [get article]

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Supported by a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute.
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